Wednesday, May 2

axiometric tribeca

An e-mail from an old co-worker reminded me how much I love axiometric maps. (I also like axonometric projections. I'm not totally sure what the difference is...)

I wonder how different this map would look today with all the new construction. Check out this axiometric comparison of DUMBO in 2002 and 2005.

The 1994 axiometric map above from MapPoster emphasizes a point I made in the Built Environment Blog last year: Tribeca is defined by its edges. (Wish I'd found this image for the original post.)

3 comments:

kiran keswani said...

The axionometric maps are extremely interesting. Maybe there should be a book "all that i needed to know i learnt in the map" with all these fun maps, and with loads of escher drawings and comparisons between all these...

Anonymous said...

I don't believe the term "axiometric" is the proper term. An axonometric projection is a plan view (looking straight down), usually rotated to 30-degrees (but any angle is appropriate) with the vertical planes then projected from the plan (usually drawn as vertical lines (parallel to the right and left margins of the paper). Usually, the vertical planes can be drawn to scale at the same scale as the plan.

An ISOMETRIC projection drawing is similar, but rather than using a plan, all plan lines (of the rectangular solid) are drawn at 30-degrees to the horizontal. Thus, a drawing of the floor will be a parallelogram rather than a rectangle. But similar to the axonometric, all vertical planes of the solid can be measured and drawn to scale.

Anonymous said...

and by the way,
this is a fabulous blog. I stumbled upon it by Googling "Kevin Lynch" and the reference to Image of the City brought me here.....

The blog will not accept img tags, so go here to see an illustration of "isometric projection":

http://melroseschools.com/mms/tech_ed/briefs/7_tech_drg_7.gif